Emergency care

Accidents (and toothaches) happen. Our dental clinics offer emergency dentistry, helping you or your loved one get the care you need when you need it. Find your nearest Bupa-owned Members First Network dental clinic here.

When should I see a dentist?

Generally, the sooner you can see a professional, the better. Our dentists reserve time in their schedules for possible urgent treatment, so give your local clinic a call and explain the issue.

Some dental emergencies involve trauma to the head or neck. If you’re experiencing symptoms like dizziness, memory lapse or bleeding from the ears or nose, we recommend contacting a doctor or visiting a hospital as soon as possible.
Dental-Treatments

On this page

  • What should I do when I have a dental emergency?
  • How can I avoid dental emergencies?

What should I do when I have a dental emergency?

One of the first things you should do is contact a dental professional. Once you’ve done this, your next steps will depend on the type of emergency.
  • Knocked-out tooth: time is critical, but stay calm! It’s absolutely possible for dentists to save dislodged teeth. Handle it by the top of the tooth instead of the root. Don’t rub away any tissue fragments. If possible, try to rinse the tooth in milk or saliva to remove any outside debris like dirt. Do not use water. Next, gently put it back into the socket and hold it in place. If this isn’t possible, keep the tooth submerged in milk or saliva, or simply place it back in the mouth next to the cheek.
  • Broken, cracked or chipped teeth: serious fractures involve damage to the tooth root, which may mean your tooth is loose, painful or bleeding. Try to rinse your mouth with warm water. If there’s any swelling, apply a cold compress. Less serious fractures often involve the outer layer (enamel) only, but it’s best to double check with a dentist and make sure there isn’t more serious damage. They can also advise on how to address chipped or jagged edges.
  • Toothache: dental pain can be caused by anything from a dental abscess (an infection, usually at the root of the tooth) to food lodged between teeth. Because pain can be a sign of a more serious problem, it’s often a good idea to see your dentist – better safe than sorry! In the meantime, you can try to relieve dental pain by rinsing your mouth with warm water. You can also gently floss in order to remove any food debris. Another possible option is over-the-counter pain relief as recommended by your doctor or pharmacist. Cold compresses are another option. Apply one to the outside of your mouth or cheek to help with discomfort and reduce swelling.

How can I avoid dental emergencies?

Of course, accidents happen, but there are steps you can take to reduce your risk.

If you regularly play high-impact sports like rugby or football, you should consider a custom-fitted mouthguard. Mouthguards can help absorb impact and reduce the likelihood of injuries to your teeth or gums. Your local Bupa-owned Members First Network dental clinic can help design and fit your mouthguard.

Avoid opening things with your mouth or teeth. It might sound like a given, but plenty of us resort to help from our teeth when we’re trying to open a stubborn bottle or bag of food. Protect your teeth and use an appropriate tool like scissors or a bottle opener instead!

Emergency care

Accidents (and toothaches) happen. Our dental clinics offer emergency dentistry, helping you or your loved one get the care you need when you need it. Find your nearest Bupa-owned Members First Network dental clinic here.

When should I see a dentist?

Generally, the sooner you can see a professional, the better. Our dentists reserve time in their schedules for possible urgent treatment, so give your local clinic a call and explain the issue.

Some dental emergencies involve trauma to the head or neck. If you’re experiencing symptoms like dizziness, memory lapse or bleeding from the ears or nose, we recommend contacting a doctor or visiting a hospital as soon as possible.
Dental-Treatments

On this page

  • What should I do when I have a dental emergency?
  • How can I avoid dental emergencies?

What should I do when I have a dental emergency?

One of the first things you should do is contact a dental professional. Once you’ve done this, your next steps will depend on the type of emergency.
  • Knocked-out tooth: time is critical, but stay calm! It’s absolutely possible for dentists to save dislodged teeth. Handle it by the top of the tooth instead of the root. Don’t rub away any tissue fragments. If possible, try to rinse the tooth in milk or saliva to remove any outside debris like dirt. Do not use water. Next, gently put it back into the socket and hold it in place. If this isn’t possible, keep the tooth submerged in milk or saliva, or simply place it back in the mouth next to the cheek.
  • Broken, cracked or chipped teeth: serious fractures involve damage to the tooth root, which may mean your tooth is loose, painful or bleeding. Try to rinse your mouth with warm water. If there’s any swelling, apply a cold compress. Less serious fractures often involve the outer layer (enamel) only, but it’s best to double check with a dentist and make sure there isn’t more serious damage. They can also advise on how to address chipped or jagged edges.
  • Toothache: dental pain can be caused by anything from a dental abscess (an infection, usually at the root of the tooth) to food lodged between teeth. Because pain can be a sign of a more serious problem, it’s often a good idea to see your dentist – better safe than sorry! In the meantime, you can try to relieve dental pain by rinsing your mouth with warm water. You can also gently floss in order to remove any food debris. Another possible option is over-the-counter pain relief as recommended by your doctor or pharmacist. Cold compresses are another option. Apply one to the outside of your mouth or cheek to help with discomfort and reduce swelling.

How can I avoid dental emergencies?

Of course, accidents happen, but there are steps you can take to reduce your risk.

If you regularly play high-impact sports like rugby or football, you should consider a custom-fitted mouthguard. Mouthguards can help absorb impact and reduce the likelihood of injuries to your teeth or gums. Your local Bupa-owned Members First Network dental clinic can help design and fit your mouthguard.

Avoid opening things with your mouth or teeth. It might sound like a given, but plenty of us resort to help from our teeth when we’re trying to open a stubborn bottle or bag of food. Protect your teeth and use an appropriate tool like scissors or a bottle opener instead!
60% - 100% back on most dental services (yearly limits apply)^